Archive for 'Biomedical Engineering'

College welcomes new students in style

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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On August 29, 2014, the college hosted the first annual event to warmly welcome more than 1,500 new engineering students to the College of Engineering community. This full day of activities included breakfast, lounging in the green space alongside Engineering Hall, a trek en masse to the chancellor’s convocation at the Kohl Center, lunch on [...]

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Understanding how ovarian cancer spreads

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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With approximately 22,000 diagnoses annually in the United States, ovarian cancer isn’t among the most commonly occurring cancers. Yet, the mortality rate for women who have ovarian cancer hovers above 60 percent. For Pamela Kreeger (pictured), an assistant professor of biomedical engineering, that number is needlessly high. Kreeger is among a group of exceptionally forward-thinking [...]

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Noninvasive intestine imaging

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This safe and noninvasive method for assessing the function and properties of the GI tract in real time could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of gut diseases. Illnesses such as small bowel bacterial overgrowth, irritable bowel syndrome [...]

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See-through sensors open new window into the brain

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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Developing invisible implantable medical sensor arrays, a team of UW-Madison engineers has overcome a major technological hurdle in researchers’ efforts to understand the brain. The team described its technology, which has applications in fields ranging from neuro-science to cardiac care and even contact lenses, in the online journal Nature Communications. Neural researchers study, monitor or [...]

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Fellowship allows BME grad students to find their passion

Posted on 25. Jul, 2014 by .

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Danielle Bourgeois’ love of science is contagious. “If you can show people how much you love it and how excited you are,” she says. “It will inspire them to stay in science and engineering, and continue doing what they love as well.” Bourgeois’ inspiration comes from studying the signaling pathways of two proteins that have [...]

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New design lab is critical part of BME undergraduate education

Posted on 25. Jul, 2014 by .

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Since the Department of Biomedical Engineering was founded in 1999, design has been at the core of its curriculum. Now, thanks to a lead gift from alumnus Peter Tong, the Webster Tompkins Design Laboratory is set to enhance the design experience for a new generation of engineers. Tong, who earned his degree in electrical and [...]

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Alumnus built a legacy of generosity

Posted on 24. Jan, 2014 by .

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In recent years, one of Andrew Johnson’s pleasures in life was to read letters of gratitude from College of Engineering under-graduates who received Great People Scholarships. “Every time he got a letter, he was exuberant about it, and he was happy to do so much good for those students,” says Johnson’s son, Robert. Andrew passed [...]

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Technology helps humans and horses

Posted on 27. Sep, 2013 by .

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Biomedical Engineering Professor Ray Vanderby always thought there was more information in an ultrasound signal than people were using. Vanderby and his students specialize in tissue healing and regeneration in musculo-skeletal tissues—and they can use all the information about damaged tissue they can get. That’s where ultrasound can be an added benefit. “If we’re only [...]

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Fighting disease by re-creating it

Posted on 27. Sep, 2013 by .

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Like many good lab discoveries, this one came about by accident. While trying to engineer healthy heart valves, Biomedical Engineering Associate Professor Kristyn Masters was discouraged that cells her student was culturing were forming nasty-looking nodules. These nodules can be present in disease and made the sample cells impossible to use for their intended purpose. [...]

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Light reflects risk of cancer

Posted on 27. Sep, 2013 by .

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Seated at the intersection of an academic department and two research institutes, Biomedical Engineering Assistant Professor Jeremy Rogers finds himself in what he calls a perfect opportunity. A co-investigator in the UW-Madison Laboratory for Optical and Computational Instrumentation (LOCI) and a member of the McPherson Eye Research Institute, Rogers welcomes the highs that come from [...]

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Virtual internship, real engineering

Posted on 02. May, 2013 by .

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Applying the role-playing and problem-solving conventions often employed in video games, a computer simulation called Nephrotex enables engineering undergrads to assume the role of biomedical engineering interns working at a fictional company, giving them an early peek at what it’s like to apply math and science skills to a real-world problem. “It’s about learning to [...]

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Our global footprint

Posted on 01. May, 2013 by .

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Bob Lorenz walks eagerly to a favorite spot—a wall of photos of faculty, staff and students associated with Wisconsin Electric Machines and Power Electronics Consortium (WEMPEC)—in the Mechanical Engineering Building. Among those photos are the faces of international students and visiting scholars, and Lorenz traces invisible lines between himself, former students who have returned as [...]

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Five questions with Frank Pfefferkorn about manufacturing systems education

Posted on 01. May, 2013 by .

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  Frank Pfefferkorn is an associate professor of mechanical engineering and director of the Manufacturing Systems Engineering Program at UW-Madison. Q: What is the Manufacturing Systems Engineering program? A: The Manufacturing Systems Engineering (MSE) program is an interdisciplinary master’s degree-granting program that was founded in 1983. The MSE program is part of the College of [...]

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Can infant lung disease predict adult heart health?

Posted on 01. May, 2013 by .

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With $3.27 million from the National Institutes of Health, Pediatrics and Biomedical Engineering Associate Professor Marlowe W. Eldridge and Biomedical Engineering Associate Professor Naomi Chesler will research how bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a common condition in low-birth-weight infants, acts as a predictor of right heart failure in adulthood. Finding such a correlation could greatly inform treatment strategies [...]

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Video tool could help active workers avoid injury

Posted on 01. May, 2013 by .

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Video of workers performing tasks such as assembling a manufactured part or packing boxes could help assess the likelihood that those people will develop common repetitive-motion injuries. Repeatedly performing the same motions and exertions can lead to injuries in which the body suffers strain from even tiny actions—for example, handling small parts, operating a machine [...]

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Sharing the Badger pride

Posted on 10. Dec, 2012 by .

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By the time you are reading this message, I will have completed a tremendous chapter in my life. I am a December 2012 graduate of the UW-Madison Department of Mechanical Engineering, and I’m very proud to join the ranks of more than 45,000 UW-Madison engineering alumni around the globe. As a four-year member of the [...]

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From canvas to CAD

Posted on 10. Dec, 2012 by .

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Memorial gift encourages students to solve problems creatively across disciplines Leonardo Da Vinci had his flying machine. George Dergalis had his spaceship sculpture–a sphere 40 feet tall and 30 feet around, adorned with a domed glass skylight and filled with murals dedicated to the potential impact that space travel and biotechnology could have on human [...]

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Spotting ovarian cancer, before it’s too late

Posted on 29. Aug, 2012 by .

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At just 28 percent, the five-year survival rate for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer is much lower than in other cancer cases. And, the disease can easily go unnoticed, making it difficult to find effective treatments. “There are very few symptoms associated with ovarian cancer,” says Biomedical Engineering Associate Professor Paul Campagnola. “When it gets [...]

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The language of stem cells, decoded

Posted on 29. Aug, 2012 by .

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Stem cells are biological building blocks, the starting point of human life. But without proper direction, they’re not very useful when it comes to treating disease. “If we just take stem cells and inject them into you, they will simply become a cancerous tumor,” says Biomedical Engineering Assistant Professor Randy Ashton. Working in the Wisconsin [...]

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What proteins say about cell behavior

Posted on 29. Aug, 2012 by .

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Understanding how a cell makes a decision in response to a drug or stimuli—to grow, to move, or to die—could give doctors richer insight into why, in many cases, different therapies work for different patients. The key to understanding how cells make these decisions may lie within the network of proteins inside those cells. Using [...]

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For alum, innovation is a full-time hobby

Posted on 27. Aug, 2012 by .

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Although he grew up on a dairy farm in a tiny, central-Wisconsin community—rather than a small coal-mining town in West Virginia—Dennis Bahr sees elements of his childhood in the movie October Sky, a film based on the true story of Homer Hickam, a coal-miner’s son who ultimately became a NASA engineer. Hickam’s passion was rocketry; [...]

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Insights on innovation

Posted on 27. Aug, 2012 by .

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UW-Madison is recognizing 2012-13 as the Year of Innovation, offering a chance to reflect on what this concept means to the university and to society. With $136 million in research and more than 100 patent disclosures annually, the College of Engineering has worked to cultivate innovation as standard operating procedure in our classrooms and labs. [...]

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Jacqueline Gerhart: Engineering quality patient care

Posted on 20. Apr, 2012 by .

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While her heart is most definitely in the world of patient care, Dr. Jacqueline Gerhart serves as a superb example of the flexibility and potential of a biomedical engineering degree from the College of Engineering. Like many biomedical engineers, Gerhart has been captivated by medical gadgetry since her first day on the College of Engineering [...]

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Residential community helps science-minded college women succeed

Posted on 19. Apr, 2012 by .

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Some of my classes can be daunting when I’m the only—or one of a few— female members,” says Jessica MacAllister, a UW-Madison undergraduate studying computer engineering. As a woman pursuing a degree in a STEM (science, technology, engineering or math) field heavily dominated by men, MacAllister isn’t the only female who sometimes feels out of [...]

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Better health by design

Posted on 19. Apr, 2012 by .

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Biomedical engineering undergrads expect to spend a large chunk of their education working on products that solve real-world medical problems. From admission to the department all the way through to graduation, they take a series of design courses that help them apply a suite of skills and knowledge necessary for devising solutions to challenges that [...]

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Who knew? Five questions with Bill Murphy about biotech innovation

Posted on 19. Apr, 2012 by .

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Bill Murphy is an associate professor of biomedical engineering, materials science and engineering, and orthopedics and rehabilitation. Murphy and his students develop new biomaterials and uses for biomaterials, as well as new approaches for drug delivery and gene therapy. He and various collaborators have founded two spin-off companies, collaborated with several other established companies, and [...]

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From lab bench to lab results: Diagnostics for developing countries

Posted on 19. Apr, 2012 by .

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Biomedical Engineering Professor David Beebe and his collaborator, Oncology Professor Emeritus Richard Burgess, have received a Point-of-Care Diagnostics grant through Grand Challenges in Global Health, an initiative created by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The initiative seeks to engage creative minds across scientific disciplines—including those who have not traditionally taken part in health research—to [...]

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‘Great people’ in the College of Engineering

Posted on 09. Dec, 2011 by .

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The UW-Madison Great People Scholarship Campaign and funding through the College of Engineering Dean’s Fund for Excellence help keep the university accessible to students who have the intellectual ability, curiosity and tenacity to achieve their educational goals. Great People scholarships are need-based grants. Donor gifts and pledges total nearly $14 million since the campaign was [...]

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Gifts that last for life

Posted on 09. Dec, 2011 by .

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The College of Engineering is preparing globally competent engineers for the 21st century. Engineers today require both great disciplinary technical depth and interdisciplinary and cultural breadth to tackle the complex global challenges we all face. Alumni and friends are vital to this goal. Your gift will provide us with the resources to prepare the next [...]

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Materials engineer applies education to stem cell challenges

Posted on 06. Oct, 2011 by .

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The more Engineering Physics and Biomedical Engineering Professor Wendy Crone (pictured with Professor of Medicine Tim Kamp) worked with biologists, chemical engineers, medical professionals and others, the more she realized she wanted to go back to school. Now Crone is studying polymeric hydrogels, a class of polymeric materials that incorporate 10 to 100 times more [...]

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