Archive for 'Engineering Physics'

College welcomes new students in style

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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On August 29, 2014, the college hosted the first annual event to warmly welcome more than 1,500 new engineering students to the College of Engineering community. This full day of activities included breakfast, lounging in the green space alongside Engineering Hall, a trek en masse to the chancellor’s convocation at the Kohl Center, lunch on [...]

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Studying in Hong Kong expands Wisconsin native’s worldview

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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By Jasmine Sola Traveler, musician, Goldwater scholar and engineer: Senior Geoff McConohy does it all. McConohy, 20, studies engineering physics and hopes ultimately to earn a PhD in materials science. In fall 2013, he traveled to Hong Kong through the college International Engineering Studies and Programs office for four months to study abroad. McConohy, who doesn’t [...]

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Energy research for a stronger society

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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By Scott Gordon It’s hard to find an energy researcher in the College of Engineering who thinks only about one piece of the energy puzzle. Talk to an engine researcher about fuel efficiency, and pretty soon you’ll be discussing the engine as a bigger system. Ask an electrical engineer about power storage, and the conversation [...]

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Alumnus built a legacy of generosity

Posted on 24. Jan, 2014 by .

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In recent years, one of Andrew Johnson’s pleasures in life was to read letters of gratitude from College of Engineering under-graduates who received Great People Scholarships. “Every time he got a letter, he was exuberant about it, and he was happy to do so much good for those students,” says Johnson’s son, Robert. Andrew passed [...]

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Astronaut scholarship honors undergrad’s bold adventures in research

Posted on 24. Jan, 2014 by .

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Even in the UW-Madison College of Engineering, where undergraduates are encouraged to seek hands-on experience, it’s rare that a faculty member finds himself taken aback by a freshman’s eagerness to get involved in research. That’s how Karu Sankaralingam, an associate professor of computer science and electrical and computer engineering, remembers his first conversation with electrical [...]

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Stiff, strong and stable composites

Posted on 27. Sep, 2013 by .

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It was a sweltering day on Long Island, and young Rod Lakes and his family were stuck in the middle of a traffic jam. Up the road, there was a drawbridge. Its two halves had expanded due to the heat and, instead of closing properly, the pieces overlapped. Though at the time Lakes didn’t realize [...]

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From helix to donut

Posted on 27. Sep, 2013 by .

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Understanding how a Pegasus plasma forms Because the UW-Madison experiment Pegasus is among the world’s most compact tokamaks, the device plays a unique role in global efforts to develop fusion as a viable energy source. In particular, Pegasus—a very-low-aspect-ratio tokamak that has a small center hole and nearly spherical shape—serves as a testbed for plasma [...]

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In Wisconsin, cold-spray knowledge is a hot commodity

Posted on 27. Sep, 2013 by .

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Back in the mid-1980s, Fisher Barton founder Richard Wilkey (BSMetE ’59) was looking for coatings to extend the life of the lawnmower blades his Wisconsin-based company manufactured. For help, he looked to Frank Worzala, then a professor of metallurgical and mineral engineering, and Worzala’s master’s student Bill Lenling (BSMetE ‘84, MSMetE ‘86), who was seeking [...]

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A fusion star

Posted on 02. May, 2013 by .

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Lauren Garrison is soft-spoken, yet outgoing and a good listener to boot. She is equally comfortable chatting with kids in a grade-school classroom or with elite scientists at an international conference. A trained dancer, she is a crowd leader and a comfortable performer. In life, she seeks opportunities, rather than waiting for them to come [...]

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With 400th PhD grad, UW-Madison celebrates half a century of fusion energy

Posted on 02. May, 2013 by .

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In the 1930s and ‘40s, many researchers studied ways to use fusion, the reaction in which atomic nuclei collide, fuse and release energy, to develop atomic weapons. Later, researchers would begin to focus on beneficial applications of fusion, including developing plants that would produce electrical energy for society. Noted physicist Don Kerst was among those [...]

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Silicon Valley Badger Engineers: How the West was won

Posted on 02. May, 2013 by .

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Here’s a story that could aptly be titled, “Only in Silicon Valley.” Three young entrepreneurs come to Inspovation—a Los Altos, California, venture firm—with a cool idea to create a cheaper alternative to renting cars at airports. The team has an impressive lineage from Harvard, MIT and Princeton. As the conversation continues, the investors find the [...]

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Sharing the Badger pride

Posted on 10. Dec, 2012 by .

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By the time you are reading this message, I will have completed a tremendous chapter in my life. I am a December 2012 graduate of the UW-Madison Department of Mechanical Engineering, and I’m very proud to join the ranks of more than 45,000 UW-Madison engineering alumni around the globe. As a four-year member of the [...]

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Love of big ideas led inventor to Wisconsin project

Posted on 10. Dec, 2012 by .

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Fourteen years ago, Grainger Professor of Nuclear Engineering Gerald Kulcinski sat down for lunch with a fellow member of the National Academy of Engineering during a Washington, D.C., event. The two had never met, but had an enthusiastic exchange of ideas about their respective research interests. That’s common at big scientific meetings, but this was [...]

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From canvas to CAD

Posted on 10. Dec, 2012 by .

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Memorial gift encourages students to solve problems creatively across disciplines Leonardo Da Vinci had his flying machine. George Dergalis had his spaceship sculpture–a sphere 40 feet tall and 30 feet around, adorned with a domed glass skylight and filled with murals dedicated to the potential impact that space travel and biotechnology could have on human [...]

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UW nuclear engineering: A 50-year history of excellence

Posted on 29. Aug, 2012 by .

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In 1942, in a reactor known as Chicago Pile-1, physicist Enrico Fermi and his team achieved the world’s first sustained nuclear reaction. Three years later, in the final weeks of World War II, the United States exploded two atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, demonstrating to the world the destructive power of nuclear. After [...]

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In theory, plasma heals itself

Posted on 29. Aug, 2012 by .

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The world’s largest stellarator uses external magnetic coils to generate fields that can contain the extreme conditions required to fuse nuclei. The Large Helical Device (LHD) operating in Japan creates a magnetic bottle that can hold hot plasma with the intention of re-creating conditions for nuclear fusion akin to those on the sun. Shaping and [...]

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Scanning the sky: Lasers monitor wind turbine health

Posted on 29. Aug, 2012 by .

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Thousands of wind turbines across the United States generate an estimated 48,000 megawatts of cumulative power. Blades on these massive systems can reach 50 yards in length and represent one of the biggest maintenance challenges to keeping turbines under power. “These turbines are interesting machines because they are so large, they are quite flexible and [...]

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Active, engaging education. Anywhere. And right here.

Posted on 28. Aug, 2012 by .

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In every building on the College of Engineering campus, there are classrooms and lecture halls packed with students listening to lectures. Yet, increasingly, that very traditional way of learning is not the only way UW-Madison engineering students are learning. “The 50-minute lecture is one of the most inefficient methods for human learning to occur,” says [...]

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Insights on innovation

Posted on 27. Aug, 2012 by .

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UW-Madison is recognizing 2012-13 as the Year of Innovation, offering a chance to reflect on what this concept means to the university and to society. With $136 million in research and more than 100 patent disclosures annually, the College of Engineering has worked to cultivate innovation as standard operating procedure in our classrooms and labs. [...]

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James McCarthy: Applying engineering and medicine to help children walk

Posted on 20. Apr, 2012 by .

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Bone is a remarkable organ, says orthopedic surgeon and engineering mechanics graduate James McCarthy (BSEM ’86). It grows and heals itself, and not many organs can do that. It can be cut and gradually lengthened. The bone fills itself in. If done at the right rhythm, a bone can grow to be just about as [...]

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Airing the dirty laundry

Posted on 20. Apr, 2012 by .

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A team of 14 engineering mechanics and astronautics students hopes its experiment through the NASA Microgravity University program will solve one of the more vexing problems—dust—of long-term space travel. “There are two main problems with dust in space,” says Julie Mason, one of the EMA seniors leading the team. “First, if the Apollo astronauts had [...]

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A tip that never gets old

Posted on 19. Apr, 2012 by .

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With colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania, and IBM Research-Zürich, UW-Madison engineers fabricated an extremely sharp nanoscale tip made from silicon carbide. The tip, which wears away at a rate of less than one atom per millimeter of sliding on a silicon dioxide substrate, is thousands of times more wear-resistant than previous designs. The advance [...]

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Benson, Carbon, among nation’s elite engineers

Posted on 19. Apr, 2012 by .

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On February 9, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) named two UW-Madison engineering faculty members to its 2012 class of new members. Wisconsin Distinguished Professor of Geological Engineering and Civil and Environmental Engineering Craig Benson and Engineering Physics Professor Emeritus Max Carbon are among 66 new members and 10 foreign associates elected to the NAE [...]

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Gifts that last for life

Posted on 09. Dec, 2011 by .

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The College of Engineering is preparing globally competent engineers for the 21st century. Engineers today require both great disciplinary technical depth and interdisciplinary and cultural breadth to tackle the complex global challenges we all face. Alumni and friends are vital to this goal. Your gift will provide us with the resources to prepare the next [...]

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Cold enough to see clearly

Posted on 06. Oct, 2011 by .

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Astrophysics instruments that measure very faint, distant sources of light need to be very cold to be sensitive enough to detect individual photons. These detectors work by measuring the change in temperature that occurs when a single photon hits the detector and deposits energy. Because this temperature rise is extremely tiny, only a very cold [...]

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To deter nuclear terrorism, should we inspect all incoming freight?

Posted on 06. Oct, 2011 by .

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Inspecting ship containers for nuclear weapons is a daunting task. More than 11.6 million cargo containers enter U.S. ports each year, with 32,000 maritime containers entering ports each day. Ninety percent of containers enter through 10 of the highest-volume ports, but there are more than 300 ports operating in the United States. The United States [...]

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DOE awards UW-Madison engineers $5.6 million for future reactor technology

Posted on 06. Oct, 2011 by .

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The U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy University Program awarded five out of 51 grants nationwide to researchers in the Department of Engineering Physics. In total, DOE awarded $39 million in research grants aimed at developing cutting-edge nuclear energy technologies, and training and educating the next generation of leaders in the U.S. nuclear industry. Izabela [...]

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Materials engineer applies education to stem cell challenges

Posted on 06. Oct, 2011 by .

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The more Engineering Physics and Biomedical Engineering Professor Wendy Crone (pictured with Professor of Medicine Tim Kamp) worked with biologists, chemical engineers, medical professionals and others, the more she realized she wanted to go back to school. Now Crone is studying polymeric hydrogels, a class of polymeric materials that incorporate 10 to 100 times more [...]

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Teaching the societal side of engineering

Posted on 29. Sep, 2011 by .

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Outreach initiative engages middle-school students and teachers When Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Amy Wendt (right) was in ninth grade, her teacher asked the class if anyone liked math. Sitting in the front row, Wendt eagerly put up her hand. Then she realized she was the only one. Now, Wendt is helping math and science [...]

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EXPO, olympiad, student exchange

Posted on 29. Sep, 2011 by .

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THOUSANDS EXPERIENCE SCIENCE AT SUCCESSFUL ENGINEERING EXPO Standing anywhere in the Engineering Centers Building atrium April 14, 15 and 16, it was impossible to ignore the bass thundering out of a very large stereo speaker located at the north end of the building. This was no ordinary speaker. “Just last night,” said electrical engineering PhD [...]

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