Archive for 'People'

5 questions with Dick Schoofs

Posted on 23. Jan, 2014 by .

0

In February 2014, the college will celebrate 20 years of the Schoofs Prize for Creativity, the oldest running innovation prize on the UW-Madison campus. Since its inception, the contest has yielded several spin-off companies and hundreds of creative ideas, and participants often cite their Schoofs Prize experiences as a major factor in their professional success. [...]

Continue Reading

Her response: Increase the ‘reward’ in high-risk scenarios

Posted on 27. Sep, 2013 by .

0

Industrial and Systems Engineering Associate Professor Laura McLay’s research canvas is massive data—banks of millions of emergency 911 calls, commercial airline flights and ship cargo deliveries—which she uses to tease out the risk factors in these high-stakes endeavors. As a data challenge, it might seem like searching for the proverbial needle in the haystack, but [...]

Continue Reading

Fighting disease by re-creating it

Posted on 27. Sep, 2013 by .

0

Like many good lab discoveries, this one came about by accident. While trying to engineer healthy heart valves, Biomedical Engineering Associate Professor Kristyn Masters was discouraged that cells her student was culturing were forming nasty-looking nodules. These nodules can be present in disease and made the sample cells impossible to use for their intended purpose. [...]

Continue Reading

Light reflects risk of cancer

Posted on 27. Sep, 2013 by .

0

Seated at the intersection of an academic department and two research institutes, Biomedical Engineering Assistant Professor Jeremy Rogers finds himself in what he calls a perfect opportunity. A co-investigator in the UW-Madison Laboratory for Optical and Computational Instrumentation (LOCI) and a member of the McPherson Eye Research Institute, Rogers welcomes the highs that come from [...]

Continue Reading

Students hungry for business success savor campus resources

Posted on 27. Sep, 2013 by .

0

Like any engineer worth his or her salt, Eric Martell can identify and analyze a problem when he sees it. Particularly when it’s sandwich-related. One fateful lunch hour, a driver for Silver Mine Subs told Martell he’d save time and money by calling in orders instead of ordering through a clunky (and expensive) third-party ordering [...]

Continue Reading

Materials innovator Padma Gopalan: Bringing nature’s complexity to polymer synthesis

Posted on 27. Sep, 2013 by .

0

Associate professor, materials science and engineering Director, Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center Padma Gopalan’s research focuses on designing, synthesizing and characterizing new types of polymers with the ability to self-assemble into a wide range of useful nanostructures. Yet one of her favorite nanostructures comes not from the lab but from nature, on the wings of [...]

Continue Reading

Q&A with materials innovator Dane Morgan

Posted on 27. Sep, 2013 by .

0

  Associate professor, materials science and engineering and engineering physics Co-Director, Wisconsin Materials Institute Talk about your research. What, simply, do you study? I use computational modeling to understand and predict materials properties for a wide range of applications. By solving the fundamental quantum mechanical equations that describe atomic interactions, I can predict how atoms [...]

Continue Reading

Q&A with materials innovator Luke Mawst

Posted on 27. Sep, 2013 by .

0

Professor, electrical and computer engineering Co-founder, Alfalight / Co-founder, Intraband Talk about your research. What, simply, do you study? The main thrust of my research is really looking at new semiconductor compounds and the application of these compounds into optoelectronic devices. Most people are familiar with the most common semiconductor material, silicon. But there’s a [...]

Continue Reading

Applying aquatic chemistry to solve our water quality problems

Posted on 02. May, 2013 by .

0

Guest columnist Christina Remucal is an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering. She joined the college in August 2012. Water is one of life’s necessities. Growing up in the high desert of northern New Mexico gave me a deep appreciation for the preciousness of water. My family has its own groundwater well and, thankfully, [...]

Continue Reading

Silicon Valley Badger: Jim Sorden

Posted on 02. May, 2013 by .

0

“I’ve spent my whole life measuring time” The Global Positioning System (GPS), today one of the most versatile technologies on the planet, was still a highly experimental, underfunded military project when it first piqued Jim Sorden’s interest in the mid-1980s. But its potential compelled Sorden to make a bold move, leaving his 24-year career with [...]

Continue Reading

Silicon Valley Badger: Craig Palmer

Posted on 02. May, 2013 by .

0

And now for something completely different Some career trajectories follow a straight and narrow path; others take unexpected twists and turns. Craig Palmer’s career might be likened to a cross-country road trip—the kind where you leave the map at home and see where the road takes you. Palmer, a 1983 graduate of electrical and computer [...]

Continue Reading

Silicon Valley Badger: Tom Werner

Posted on 02. May, 2013 by .

0

Helping solar energy’s future shine bright Thomas Werner’s solar energy company, SunPower Inc., in San Jose, has been keeping some pretty high-profile company these days. Take the San Francisco 49ers: The franchise is partnering with SunPower this year to make the new $1.2 billion Santa Clara stadium the greenest in the National Football League. It [...]

Continue Reading

A fusion star

Posted on 02. May, 2013 by .

0

Lauren Garrison is soft-spoken, yet outgoing and a good listener to boot. She is equally comfortable chatting with kids in a grade-school classroom or with elite scientists at an international conference. A trained dancer, she is a crowd leader and a comfortable performer. In life, she seeks opportunities, rather than waiting for them to come [...]

Continue Reading

A blueprint for success: Helping transfer students overcome any obstacle

Posted on 02. May, 2013 by .

0

Growing up in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, Daniel Ramirez eyed the circuitry of arcade cabinets with wonder. But turning that ambition into a career as an engineer was a pipe dream. “After high school, I figured that I wasn’t going to be able to afford college,” he says. Instead, he focused on building a family with his [...]

Continue Reading

Silicon Valley Badger Engineers: How the West was won

Posted on 02. May, 2013 by .

0

Here’s a story that could aptly be titled, “Only in Silicon Valley.” Three young entrepreneurs come to Inspovation—a Los Altos, California, venture firm—with a cool idea to create a cheaper alternative to renting cars at airports. The team has an impressive lineage from Harvard, MIT and Princeton. As the conversation continues, the investors find the [...]

Continue Reading

Gustafson named to National Academy of Engineering

Posted on 01. May, 2013 by .

0

In February, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) named David Gustafson to its 2013 class of new members. Gustafson is director of the UW-Madison Center for Health Enhancement Systems Studies and a professor emeritus of industrial and systems engineering. The academy cited Gustafson for industrial and systems engineering methods to improve care for aging patients [...]

Continue Reading

Alumnus gives back by advancing Wisconsin innovation

Posted on 10. Dec, 2012 by .

0

When Frederick Mancheski spent 35 years building Echlin Inc. into one of the world’s largest automobile parts companies, he would frequently employ a secret weapon in his quest for new technology: The engine experts at the UW-Madison. As Echlin CEO, the 1948 mechanical engineering alumnus oversaw the Connecticut-based company’s growth from $10 million in annual [...]

Continue Reading

Love of big ideas led inventor to Wisconsin project

Posted on 10. Dec, 2012 by .

0

Fourteen years ago, Grainger Professor of Nuclear Engineering Gerald Kulcinski sat down for lunch with a fellow member of the National Academy of Engineering during a Washington, D.C., event. The two had never met, but had an enthusiastic exchange of ideas about their respective research interests. That’s common at big scientific meetings, but this was [...]

Continue Reading

From canvas to CAD

Posted on 10. Dec, 2012 by .

0

Memorial gift encourages students to solve problems creatively across disciplines Leonardo Da Vinci had his flying machine. George Dergalis had his spaceship sculpture–a sphere 40 feet tall and 30 feet around, adorned with a domed glass skylight and filled with murals dedicated to the potential impact that space travel and biotechnology could have on human [...]

Continue Reading

Looking up

Posted on 10. Dec, 2012 by .

0

Prestigious professorship is the impetus for a structural engineering renaissance at UW-Madison In our built environment, it seems even the sky’s not the limit. Over the past eight years, countries in the Middle East and Asia have completed the world’s five tallest skyscrapers. At 163 floors and 2,171 feet tall, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai [...]

Continue Reading

Dream it, design it, build it

Posted on 10. Dec, 2012 by .

0

$1.5 million alum gift helps ME department better prepare students for dynamic industry If you ask Mechanical Engineering Professor and Chair Roxann Engelstad how engineering in the 21st century has evolved, her answer is one of both challenge and opportunity. “It moves so fast, it is hard to keep up,” says Engelstad, who holds the [...]

Continue Reading

Milestones: Reflections on Paul Peercy’s tenure as dean

Posted on 10. Dec, 2012 by .

0

“Since Paul brought his blend of academic and industry experience to Madison in 1999, his primary commitment has always been to the students in the College of Engineering and preparing them for success in a rapidly shifting professional environment. He has combined commitments to the basic concepts of engineering and to the creativity and flexibility [...]

Continue Reading

College of Engineering industrial advisory and early-career boards

Posted on 30. Aug, 2012 by .

0

Industrial Advisory Board Richard Antoine, President, National Academy of Human Resources Cynthia Bachmann, Vice President, Engineering, Kohler Kitchen & Bath (IAB chair) William C. Beckman, CEO, X-nth John E. Berndt, President (retired), Sprint International Vincent S. Chan, Director, Theory & Computational Science Energy Group, General Atomics Kim Christopher, Vice President, Vision Strategic Solutions, UnitedHealthCare Donna [...]

Continue Reading

For alum, innovation is a full-time hobby

Posted on 27. Aug, 2012 by .

0

Although he grew up on a dairy farm in a tiny, central-Wisconsin community—rather than a small coal-mining town in West Virginia—Dennis Bahr sees elements of his childhood in the movie October Sky, a film based on the true story of Homer Hickam, a coal-miner’s son who ultimately became a NASA engineer. Hickam’s passion was rocketry; [...]

Continue Reading

Insights on innovation

Posted on 27. Aug, 2012 by .

0

UW-Madison is recognizing 2012-13 as the Year of Innovation, offering a chance to reflect on what this concept means to the university and to society. With $136 million in research and more than 100 patent disclosures annually, the College of Engineering has worked to cultivate innovation as standard operating procedure in our classrooms and labs. [...]

Continue Reading

Tom Gerold: Passionate innovation—pesticide, nitinol and a broken leg

Posted on 20. Apr, 2012 by .

0

“Innovation. The very word evokes mental images of complex turbo-machinery, nanoscale robots and iPads. Our brains are tuned to think of people like Thomas Edison, Steve Jobs and the Wright Brothers when the word reaches our ears. Something innovative is something desired—celebrated even—in our society. Imagine a world where the common cold is a life-threatening [...]

Continue Reading

Jacqueline Gerhart: Engineering quality patient care

Posted on 20. Apr, 2012 by .

0

While her heart is most definitely in the world of patient care, Dr. Jacqueline Gerhart serves as a superb example of the flexibility and potential of a biomedical engineering degree from the College of Engineering. Like many biomedical engineers, Gerhart has been captivated by medical gadgetry since her first day on the College of Engineering [...]

Continue Reading

Katherine Turner: My path to becoming a deepwater drilling engineer

Posted on 20. Apr, 2012 by .

0

My name at the time was Kate Parker. Rumor had it that I was the first female undergraduate since World War II. I was a psychology major in 1975 looking for an engineering degree when I ran into Professor Heinz in the mining and metallurgy hallway. He was the first middle-aged adult I spotted. He [...]

Continue Reading

James McCarthy: Applying engineering and medicine to help children walk

Posted on 20. Apr, 2012 by .

0

Bone is a remarkable organ, says orthopedic surgeon and engineering mechanics graduate James McCarthy (BSEM ’86). It grows and heals itself, and not many organs can do that. It can be cut and gradually lengthened. The bone fills itself in. If done at the right rhythm, a bone can grow to be just about as [...]

Continue Reading