Tag Archives: 2015

Continuous improvement

Posted on 02. Nov, 2015 by .

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Even before many of our engineering students left campus for the summer, we began thinking about the coming academic year and how we can improve the educational experiences we deliver to them. That was particularly true this past summer. Not only have we embarked on a number of renovations that will yield more flexible, modern [...]

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College welcomes new students in style

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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On August 29, 2014, the college hosted the first annual event to warmly welcome more than 1,500 new engineering students to the College of Engineering community. This full day of activities included breakfast, lounging in the green space alongside Engineering Hall, a trek en masse to the chancellor’s convocation at the Kohl Center, lunch on [...]

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Collaboration aims at longer-lasting roads for northern states

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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By Scott Gordon More than 80 percent of major roads in the United States are still surfaced with asphaltic mixtures—and the liquid asphalt, a byproduct of oil refining, remains a bit of a chemical mess, an inconsistent, complex mix of hydrocarbons. So to understand how different kinds of asphalt will hold up under the weight [...]

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System alerts Great Lakes swimmers of dangerous currents

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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By Scott Gordon The history of the Great Lakes is one of people who underestimate their destructive power, often with tragic results. From two massive waves that smashed into Chicago’s harbors in 1954 to a rip current that drowned a young swimmer in Port Washington, Wisconsin, in 2012, Lake Michigan and its neighbors have a [...]

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It’s a great time to be an engineer

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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By Jasmine Sola As the job market has increasingly become more difficult, a college degree no longer guarantees a job. Luckily, however, for most engineers this is not the case. According to John Archambault, director of Engineering Career Services, 94 percent of College of Engineering graduates were placed at a job after graduation in 2011 [...]

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Wisconsin Robotics takes Scorpio to national competition

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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By Jasmine Sola Scorpio, a robot created by a team of UW-Madison students, is named for the rear arm that rises above its wheels and body, resembling a scorpion tail poised to strike. It also shares its name with a well-known constellation, which is fitting, as it’s intended to function as a planetary rover in [...]

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Studying in Hong Kong expands Wisconsin native’s worldview

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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By Jasmine Sola Traveler, musician, Goldwater scholar and engineer: Senior Geoff McConohy does it all. McConohy, 20, studies engineering physics and hopes ultimately to earn a PhD in materials science. In fall 2013, he traveled to Hong Kong through the college International Engineering Studies and Programs office for four months to study abroad. McConohy, who doesn’t [...]

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Undergrad finds his passion by jumping into the deep end

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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By Scott Gordon When Arjun Seshadri decided to study engineering, he wasn’t necessarily thinking about medical applications. That changed when he discovered the UW-Madison Lab for Molecular Scale Engineering. Before his freshman year was over, he became a research assistant in the lab under former Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Robert Blick and his graduate [...]

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Engineering in the extreme

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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By Jasmine Sola At first glance, Extreme Engineering Solutions (X-ES) located in Middleton, Wisconsin, looks like any high-tech company. The lobby is sparse with leather chairs, minimal decoration and glass-walled conference rooms. However, behind a door in the lobby that can be only be opened with a key fob, nearly 200 employees are designing and [...]

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Developing 3D-printed sheet music for the blind

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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When mechanical engineering graduate student William Aquite saw a video profiling Yeaji Kim, who was completing her PhD in the School of Music, he was intrigued. Kim, who is blind, plays piano using Braille scores. However, the scores are highly complex and yet can still lack some information traditionally included on sheet music. To address [...]

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Computing with grand demands

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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Wisconsin engineers find meaning in big data For all the scale and promise the term “big data” evokes, the exploding field of big data research really comes down to constraints. Even as high-throughput computers become increasingly powerful, it’s not feasible for them to simply brute-force their way through every massive set of information that might [...]

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Five questions with Dane Morgan about big data

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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Materials Science and Engineering Associate Professor Dane Morgan and his students use atomic-scale computer modeling to understand and design new materials. As co-director of the Wisconsin Materials Institute, he is part of an effort to leverage computational, experimental and data analysis infrastructure and expertise at UW-Madison—ultimately to help increase the speed with which the U.S. [...]

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A pattern of success

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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The Wisconsin Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation is helping to change the landscape of the STEM fields By Jasmine Sola Even at 6:30 a.m. on a weekday, Bascom Hill is filled with students making their way up and down that legendary, dreaded incline. Add a few hours, and most students would be trudging to [...]

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Energy research for a stronger society

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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By Scott Gordon It’s hard to find an energy researcher in the College of Engineering who thinks only about one piece of the energy puzzle. Talk to an engine researcher about fuel efficiency, and pretty soon you’ll be discussing the engine as a bigger system. Ask an electrical engineer about power storage, and the conversation [...]

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Water works: Breakthrough opens a crucial door in chemistry

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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A multi-institutional team has resolved a long-unanswered question about how two of the world’s most common substances interact. In a paper published in the journal Nature Communications, Manos Mavrikakis, the Paul A. Elfers professor of chemical and biological engineering, and his collaborators report fundamental discoveries about how water reacts with metal oxides. The paper opens [...]

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Understanding how ovarian cancer spreads

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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With approximately 22,000 diagnoses annually in the United States, ovarian cancer isn’t among the most commonly occurring cancers. Yet, the mortality rate for women who have ovarian cancer hovers above 60 percent. For Pamela Kreeger (pictured), an assistant professor of biomedical engineering, that number is needlessly high. Kreeger is among a group of exceptionally forward-thinking [...]

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Math + Power Grid = Extra Efficiency

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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As technology has made public infrastructure more efficient, some areas, like electricity transmission systems, have been slow to keep up. Part of the problem, says Industrial & Systems Engineering Professor Jeffrey Linderoth (pictured), boils down to math. And as part of a Department of Energy initiative, Linderoth and ISyE Associate Professor Jim Luedtke are developing mathematical [...]

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Assessing the economics of bioenergy

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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Biofuels researchers are increasingly thinking about how the energy market is changing, which challenges them to balance the basic science of new fuels with a more holistic view of the most commercially viable ways to produce them. So when a group of UW-Madison researchers began looking at how to make jet fuel from biomass, they [...]

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Noninvasive intestine imaging

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This safe and noninvasive method for assessing the function and properties of the GI tract in real time could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of gut diseases. Illnesses such as small bowel bacterial overgrowth, irritable bowel syndrome [...]

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