Tag Archives: cancer

Undergrad finds his passion by jumping into the deep end

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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By Scott Gordon When Arjun Seshadri decided to study engineering, he wasn’t necessarily thinking about medical applications. That changed when he discovered the UW-Madison Lab for Molecular Scale Engineering. Before his freshman year was over, he became a research assistant in the lab under former Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Robert Blick and his graduate [...]

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Understanding how ovarian cancer spreads

Posted on 19. Feb, 2015 by .

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With approximately 22,000 diagnoses annually in the United States, ovarian cancer isn’t among the most commonly occurring cancers. Yet, the mortality rate for women who have ovarian cancer hovers above 60 percent. For Pamela Kreeger (pictured), an assistant professor of biomedical engineering, that number is needlessly high. Kreeger is among a group of exceptionally forward-thinking [...]

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Spotting ovarian cancer, before it’s too late

Posted on 29. Aug, 2012 by .

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At just 28 percent, the five-year survival rate for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer is much lower than in other cancer cases. And, the disease can easily go unnoticed, making it difficult to find effective treatments. “There are very few symptoms associated with ovarian cancer,” says Biomedical Engineering Associate Professor Paul Campagnola. “When it gets [...]

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The language of stem cells, decoded

Posted on 29. Aug, 2012 by .

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Stem cells are biological building blocks, the starting point of human life. But without proper direction, they’re not very useful when it comes to treating disease. “If we just take stem cells and inject them into you, they will simply become a cancerous tumor,” says Biomedical Engineering Assistant Professor Randy Ashton. Working in the Wisconsin [...]

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What proteins say about cell behavior

Posted on 29. Aug, 2012 by .

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Understanding how a cell makes a decision in response to a drug or stimuli—to grow, to move, or to die—could give doctors richer insight into why, in many cases, different therapies work for different patients. The key to understanding how cells make these decisions may lie within the network of proteins inside those cells. Using [...]

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Expanding the potential of MRI for diagnosing breast cancer

Posted on 04. Oct, 2011 by .

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In the world of medical imaging, no single technology provides all the answers for the critical procedure of breast cancer biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), for example, produces clear, highly revealing images of potential breast cancer lesions, but lacks practicality in obtaining a biopsy sample. Ultrasound imaging, on the other hand, is less revealing than [...]

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From patient to scientist: Improving cancer communication

Posted on 22. Jun, 2011 by .

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When the doctor came in, he pressed on the tumor in Neeraj Arora’s chest and said Arora had lymphoma. As he recoiled in pain from the pressure on his chest, all Arora could think was, “Dave, you were so right.” Arora was thinking about his graduate advisor, Industrial and Systems Engineering Professor Emeritus Dave Gustafson, [...]

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Inside the box

Posted on 21. Jun, 2011 by .

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New method for breast cancer imaging Every woman over the age of 40 receives the same initial screening for breast cancer: a mammogram. Yet no two women are identical and neither are their breast cancer risks, so a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers is developing a system better tailored to women with a particularly [...]

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Solar researchers freeze out cancer

Posted on 01. Sep, 2010 by .

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One method for treating cancer involves injecting a patient with a metal probe in close proximity of a tumor. The probe is then rapidlycooled to the point of freezing and killing the surrounding tissue. Called a cryoprobe, the technique is gaining traction in medicine, but the procedure isn’t as simple or fast as many doctors [...]

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Spot-treating cancer

Posted on 01. Sep, 2010 by .

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Founders of UW-Madison spin-off company NeuWave Medical are improving microwave ablation, a minimally invasive procedure that could expand the number of treatment options for people with certain types of cancer. To perform microwave ablation, radiologists use ultrasound imaging or computed tomography to guide a thin antenna into the body. The antenna radiates enough energy to [...]

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A Trojan horse for tumors

Posted on 01. Sep, 2010 by .

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With their flowing, tentacle-like arms, Associate Professor Shaoqin (Sarah) Gong’s polymer nanoparticles can locate, infiltrate and annihilate cancerous tumors—currently, in mice. Someday,  tiny drug-delivery tools could be an alternative to chemotherapy as a targeted method for cancer drug delivery. Because it often grows quickly, tumor tissue is “sloppy” tissue, with leaky vasculature. “Nanoparticles are unique [...]

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