Tag Archives: healthcare

Power steering: A system for more capable catheters

Posted on 06. Oct, 2011 by .

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Atrial fibrillation is a condition where the upper chambers of a patient’s heart beat irregularly, which can cause blood to pool and increase the risk of stroke-causing clots. Treatment is difficult: A physician has to maneuver a catheter around a patient’s chest cavity to the diseased regions of the heart, which are then frozen or [...]

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Smooth transitions: CHSRA and Zimmerman will expand expertise

Posted on 06. Oct, 2011 by .

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As its 40th anniversary approaches, the Center for Health Systems Research and Analysis (CHSRA) is at the beginning of new era. Professor David Zimmerman, who directed the center for more than 20 years, retired in summer 2011. Yet that doesn’t mean he or CHSRA are slowing down; as Zimmerman focuses on new projects, CHSRA researchers [...]

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Materials engineer applies education to stem cell challenges

Posted on 06. Oct, 2011 by .

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The more Engineering Physics and Biomedical Engineering Professor Wendy Crone (pictured with Professor of Medicine Tim Kamp) worked with biologists, chemical engineers, medical professionals and others, the more she realized she wanted to go back to school. Now Crone is studying polymeric hydrogels, a class of polymeric materials that incorporate 10 to 100 times more [...]

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A new platform: DNA delivery, on demand

Posted on 04. Oct, 2011 by .

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A versatile new platform technology could enable doctors to release DNA locally in the body for a variety of therapeutic applications. Using a layer-by-layer fabrication process, Chemical and Biological Engineering Associate Professor David Lynn (left, pictured with PhD student Shane Beckler), can coat complex medical devices, such as vascular stents, with alternating nanoscale polymer and [...]

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With careful thought, brain sensors connect neurons with actions

Posted on 04. Oct, 2011 by .

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Neurologists who work to unlock the secrets of brain activity encounter what one might call the Las Vegas effect: “What happens in the brain, stays in the brain.” The skull and dura mater are efficient insulators, keeping high-frequency electrical activity from leaving the brain. And between the blood-brain barrier and the brain’s aggressive immune system, [...]

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From patent to proven product: A new approach to tech transfer

Posted on 04. Oct, 2011 by .

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On paper, it’s listed as U.S. Patent No. 7,615,593: “A faster and more effective way to treat chronic wounds through the use of a liquid cellular matrix, rather than conventional bandages.” But in practice, the patent is the subject of an exciting shift in thinking at UW-Madison about how to move medical technology from patent [...]

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Expanding the potential of MRI for diagnosing breast cancer

Posted on 04. Oct, 2011 by .

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In the world of medical imaging, no single technology provides all the answers for the critical procedure of breast cancer biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), for example, produces clear, highly revealing images of potential breast cancer lesions, but lacks practicality in obtaining a biopsy sample. Ultrasound imaging, on the other hand, is less revealing than [...]

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With second company, laser researchers are seeing new light

Posted on 04. Oct, 2011 by .

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Two professors have formed a startup company to commercialize a nanoscale laser structure that could benefit a wide range of industries. Intraband LLC was co-founded in 2008 by Philip Dunham Reed Professor Dan Botez and Professor Luke Mawst and has received recent funding from the U.S. Army and Navy Small Business Technology Transfer Programs. Botez [...]

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Unexpected twists and turns: How I ended up doing tissue engineering scaffold research

Posted on 23. Jun, 2011 by .

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By Lih-Sheng (Tom) Turng, professor, mechanical engineering Bionates theme leader, Wisconsin Institute for Discovery Wonder how a UW-Madison mechanical engineer ended up doing research on cell culture? I am not talking about me. I actually am referring to Charles Lindbergh, one of our most celebrated student from the Department of Mechanical Engineering. While Lindbergh is [...]

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Engineers team up with Trek for cycling research

Posted on 22. Jun, 2011 by .

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During a long bike ride, it’s not unusual for cyclists to experience hand or finger numbness, a very common condition known as cyclist’s palsy. The condition ranges from mild tingling to, sometimes, long-term nerve damage and hand muscle atrophy over time. A team of UW-Madison engineers has scientifically measured hand pressure during cycling and studied [...]

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UW-Madison economic impact statewide hits $12.4 billion

Posted on 21. Jun, 2011 by .

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UW-Madison’s profound impact on Wisconsin’s economy—one that totals $12.4 billion annually—is detailed in a late-March report that underscores the importance of the university to the state’s economic well being. The findings indicate that UW-Madison, along with its affiliated organizations and startup companies, supports 128,146 Wisconsin jobs and generates $614 million in state tax revenue. The [...]

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Inside the box

Posted on 21. Jun, 2011 by .

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New method for breast cancer imaging Every woman over the age of 40 receives the same initial screening for breast cancer: a mammogram. Yet no two women are identical and neither are their breast cancer risks, so a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers is developing a system better tailored to women with a particularly [...]

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Three UW-Madison award winners

Posted on 21. Jun, 2011 by .

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Philip Dunham Reed Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering Susan Hagness is one of 11 winners of the 2011 Kellet Mid-Career Award, supported by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. The award recognizes outstanding mid-career faculty members who are five to 20 years past their first promotion to a tenured position. Each winner, chosen by a [...]

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CQPI: Celebrating 25 years of quality research

Posted on 01. Sep, 2010 by .

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The offices of the Center for Quality and Productivity (CQPI) are housed in the UW-Madison Engineering Centers Building, but the center’s real work happens in hospitals, intensive care units, nursing stations and other healthcare settings around the country. Founded in 1985 by Industrial and Systems Engineering Professor Emeritus George E.P. Box and the late Professor [...]

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Fusion for energy—and medicine

Posted on 01. Sep, 2010 by .

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The UW-Madison Fusion Technology Institute and Middleton, Wisconsin-based Phoenix Nuclear Labs (PNL) share an ambitious long-term goal: clean, abundant and affordable nuclear fusion power. To fund the pursuit, PNL is developing nuclear technologies into near-term solutions for modern-day global problems, including mitigating the risk of nuclear attack, producing state-of-the-art high-voltage power systems, and generating critical [...]

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Fast fix

Posted on 01. Sep, 2010 by .

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Bioactive coatings promote cell growth For people who suffer excruciating back pain due to injury or disc degeneration, relief often comes in the form of spinal fusion and disc replacement. Metallic implants are the current standard, and while these devices mechanically fix tissue or replace vertebrae, they don’t heal the problem. Responding to patients’ need [...]

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A Trojan horse for tumors

Posted on 01. Sep, 2010 by .

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With their flowing, tentacle-like arms, Associate Professor Shaoqin (Sarah) Gong’s polymer nanoparticles can locate, infiltrate and annihilate cancerous tumors—currently, in mice. Someday,  tiny drug-delivery tools could be an alternative to chemotherapy as a targeted method for cancer drug delivery. Because it often grows quickly, tumor tissue is “sloppy” tissue, with leaky vasculature. “Nanoparticles are unique [...]

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